Does Insurance Cover Windshield Replacement? Laws in the Different States.

Written by US Auto Glass

September 15, 2022

The laws regarding insurance coverage for windshield replacement vary from state to state, so it’s important to check with your insurer to see what coverage is available in your area. Regardless of the laws in your state, if you have comprehensive insurance coverage, it’s likely that your insurer will cover at least a portion of the cost to repair or replace your damaged windshield.

In this blog post, we’ll discuss different types of insurance that may cover windshield repair or replacement and go through the list of specific laws regarding auto glass insurance in different states.

Insurance agent woman is inspecting a car's windshield damage, auto glass is cracked and shattered.

Types of Coverages That May Cover Windshield Replacement

Depending on the type of insurance coverage you have, your windshield replacement or repair may be covered.

Comprehensive Coverage

Comprehensive coverage cover damages caused by events other than a collision with another car, such as vandalism, falling objects, and, in some cases, weather damage. So, if you have comprehensive coverage and your windshield is cracked by a flying rock, you would file a claim with your insurer to have it repaired or replaced. (After you paid a deductible)

Full Glass Coverage (Auto Glass Insurance Coverage)

Full glass coverage (also known as auto glass insurance coverage) generally pays for the entire cost of repairing or replacing your windshield or auto glass, no matter what the cause.

This type of insurance is not required in all states, but it is a good idea to have it if you live in an area with a lot of construction or where hail is common. Full glass coverage typically costs between $50 and $150 per year, but it can save you hundreds or even thousands of dollars in the event of damage.

If you have full glass coverage, be sure to read your policy carefully to understand what is covered and what is not. Some insurance companies may cover only windshield damage under the full glass coverage instead of coverage of all auto glass on your car.

Collision Coverage

Collision coverage pays for damages to your car resulting from a collision with another vehicle or object.

If you have collision coverage and your windshield cracked in an accident with another car or object, you would file a claim with your insurer and pay the deductible. Your insurer will reimburse you for the cost of the repairs up to the limit of your policy.

Full Coverage

A full coverage policy includes all the coverages required by law, as well as other optional coverages that you may choose to purchase. The most common types of coverages are liability, collision, and comprehensive.

Full coverage car insurance policies also typically include personal injury protection (PIP) and medical payments coverage, which reimburse you for expenses related to injuries sustained in an accident, regardless of who is at fault.

What is Deductible?

A deductible is the amount of money you will be responsible for paying out of pocket before your insurance company will reimburse you for the remaining cost of the repairs.

For example, if you have a $250 deductible and your windshield costs $600 to replace, you will have to pay the first $250, and your insurance will cover the remaining $350.

The size of the deductible varies depending on the company and the policy, but it is typically between $200 and $1000.

States with No Deductible

Florida, South Carolina, and Kentucky obligate insurance companies not to take a deductible. Read more about specific laws in each state in the table below.

Specific Windshield Laws for Insurance Companies in All States

  1. Specific laws and deductible: in most states, comprehensive coverage covers auto glass damage (after you pay a deductible). Optional “full glass coverage” will pay for all repairs and replacements without a deductible. All states under this law will be marked as “No specific laws” in the table.
  2. Types of parts insurance use: when aftermarket or used auto glass is used, the insurance company usually must provide you with a written notice about it.
  3. Repair or replacement provider: in most states, you have the right to choose where repair or replacement will be performed, but you may have to pay the cost difference. All states under this rule will be mareked as “No specific laws” in the table.
StateSpecific laws and deductibleTypes of parts insurance useRepair or replacement provider
Alabama (AL)No specific lawsAuto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
Alaska (AK)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be used.No specific laws
Arizona (AZ)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be used.No specific laws
Arkansas (AR)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be used.No specific laws
California (CA)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Colorado (CO)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be used.No specific laws
Connecticut (CT)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Delaware (DE)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
District of Columbia (DC)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Florida (FL)There is no deductible if you have comprehensive coverage.Auto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
Georgia (GA)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Hawaii (HI)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Idaho (ID)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Illinois (IL)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Indiana (IN)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Iowa (IA)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used. (Used glass can't be used for windshield replacement, only for side windows)No specific laws
Kansas (KS)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedInsurance companies have complete control regarding choosing repair of replacement providers.
Kentucky (KY)There is no deductible if you have comprehensive coverage.Aftermarket and used glass can be used. You have the right to refuse used or aftermarket parts, but you must pay the cost difference.No specific laws
Louisiana (LA)Deductible for a windshield replacement can't be more than 250$ (If you have comprehensive coverage)Auto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
Maine (ME)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Maryland (MD)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Massachusetts (MA)The state requires insurers to offer full glass coverage with a 0-100$ deductible. You don't need to have comprehensive coverage to purchase it.If your car is 2004 or newer with less than 20,000 miles, only OEM glass can be used. Another cars may use aftermarket or used glass.No specific laws
Michigan (MI)No specific lawsAuto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
Minnesota (MN)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Mississippi (MS)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Missouri (MO)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.Insurance companies have control regarding choosing repair of replacement providers.
Montana (MT)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Nebraska (NE)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.Insurance companies have control regarding choosing repair of replacement providers.
Nevada (NV)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
New Hampshire (NH)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedYou have the right to dictate where repair or replacement will be performed.
New Jersey (NJ)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
New Mexico (NM)No specific lawsAuto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
New York (NY)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
North Carolina (NC)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
North Dakota (ND)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Ohio (OH)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Oklahoma (OK)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedInsurance companies have control regarding choosing repair of replacement providers.
Oregon (OR)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Pennsylvania (PA)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Rhode Island (RI)No specific lawsAuto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
South Carolina (SC)There is no deductible if you have comprehensive coverage.Aftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
South Dakota (SD)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.You have the right to dictate where repair or replacement will be performed.
Tennessee (TN)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Texas (TX)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Utah (UT)No specific lawsAftermarket glass can be usedNo specific laws
Vermont (VT)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Virginia (VA)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.Insurance companies have control regarding choosing repair of replacement providers.
Washington (WA)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
West Virginia (WV)No specific lawsAuto glass replacement parts must be of similar quality to the OEM.No specific laws
Wisconsin (WI)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws
Wyoming (WY)No specific lawsAftermarket and used (“recycled”) glass can be used.No specific laws

Conclusion

We hope you found this article useful. If you have any questions about windshield replacement under insurance, please let us know in the comments below. We’ll do our best to answer them and keep this post updated with the latest information. Thanks for reading!

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